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Posted:  7/16/2005 6:09 PM #393
chuck
Member
Total Posts:8
Last Post:10/10/2005
Member Since:7/16/2005
Subject: Swim With High Cl Level


I shocked my pool yesterday and this evening the Chlorine level is still at about 8.0. My daughter is having a pool party this evening. Is it OK to let people swim with the chlorine level at 8.0 ? What could happen with swimming with the Cl level above the always recommended maximum of 3.0 ?


Chuck



Posted:  7/17/2005 8:28 AM #394
orenda
Member
Total Posts:624
Last Post:6/8/2009
Member Since:6/30/2005


Chuck:
Lesson to be learned......more is not always better, especially when it comes to a chlorine-based shock, the application of which is, in my opinion, all too frequently overdone. IF a water requires shocking, consider using a non-chlorine shock to avoid the excessively high chlorine levels that result from chlorine shocks, and shock only when necessary.

To answer your question, a free chlorine level of 8 ppm is probably too high for comfortable swimming.....this can be rapidly reduced with application of a chlorine neutralizer such as sodium bisulfate easily available at your poolstore. In general, a free chlorine level in the range of 1.5 - 3.0 ppm should be maintained, though 5.0 ppm or so is commonly found in commercial pool systems.

Orenda



Posted:  7/17/2005 9:09 AM #395
chuck
Member
Total Posts:8
Last Post:10/10/2005
Member Since:7/16/2005


>>though 5.0 ppm or so is commonly found in commercial pool systems.<<
So, in other words, once it drops to 5.0, it's safe to swim, correct?
What happens if you swim with a high Cl level, such as 8.0?
Chuck



Posted:  7/17/2005 10:31 AM #396
orenda
Member
Total Posts:624
Last Post:6/8/2009
Member Since:6/30/2005


Chuck:
In my opinion, a free chlorine level of 8.0 ppm is safe to swim in, though there may be a possibility of some eye irritation and swim suit bleaching. Even though this level is considerably higher than the EPA permissible concentration for potable water, the amount of water, and therefore chlorine, ingested by swimmers is insignificant.

A free chlorine level of 5.0 ppm is commonly in both residential and commercial pool waters. The important part of this equation is not so much the higher free chlorine concentrations as it is the low safe level that should be maintained, generally quoted at 1.0 ppm to ensure sanitizing of the water (actually, 0.5 ppm is the bare minimum required for this).

Orenda



Posted:  7/17/2005 1:05 PM #397
Chuck L Head
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Total Posts:39
Last Post:7/26/2005
Member Since:7/10/2005
Orenda,

You suggest a non-chlorine shock. I'm not familiar with them...only because when one goes to the pool store with a need to shock, their first and only recommendation is a Cl based shock. Any particular non-Cl that you've used and had good results with? How does it compare, sanitation-wise, with Cl? In other words, I've used Cl shock before and had good results, usually overnight. How does non-Cl stack up? Also, is it safe to assume that non-Cl is compatible with the Cl I'm dropping into my feeder?

I'm always looking to learn more about this stuff.

Thanks!




Posted:  7/17/2005 2:08 PM #398
chuck
Member
Total Posts:8
Last Post:10/10/2005
Member Since:7/16/2005


Mr. Head,
I'm not an administrator and I'm no pool expert, that's why I started this thread, however,I've maintained an inground pool for 10 years now and have some of my own observartions which I'll pass on.

I personally feel that non-chlorine shock is to be used in an emergency and not on a regular basis. For example, suppose the water is a little cluody and has lost it's nice bright glistening sheen and in a few hours some friends are coming over to swim. Go ahead and use the non-chlorine and you'll kill a lot of the contaminants for awhile and still be able to swim. But personally, to really sanitize a pool properly you need to shock it with a chlorine based shock. I like to use calcium hypochlorite because it dissolves easily and does not contain cyanuric acid.

Chuck



Posted:  7/17/2005 8:02 PM #399
orenda
Member
Total Posts:624
Last Post:6/8/2009
Member Since:6/30/2005


Chuck L Head & Chuck:
Possibly I can answer both of your questions/concerns with this posting..............

To begin, and forgive me if I misread or misinterperted your posts, the term "shock" is applicable to the use of a material that will enhance in the short term oxidation of various contaminants in pool water that cannot be otherwise oxidized by the usual dose of free chlorine to the pool. Historically, this process has involved the use of a chlorine compound at an exceptionally high level to "breakpoint" oxidize such contaminants as chloramines, organic residues, etc. More recently, non-chlorine shock products, predominantly containing potassium monopersulfate but sometimes other chemistries such as sodium percarbonate, have been on the market as a desirable replacement for chlorine-based shock products as they do not contribute to additional chloramine formation which will occur with the common insufficient application of chlorine based shock products, and other issues such as chlorine levels too high for safe and comfortable swimming in the near term. This by definition is the only proper use of the term "shock". In any case, non-chlorine shock products are oxidizers, by definition not sanitizers or disinfectants although they may function in these ways to some degree, though not so recognized by the USEPA.

All too often, the term "shock" is used for the application of a chlorine-based compound to raise the free chlorine level in the pool water to whatever the desired concentration should be. This is, and should be, entirely the function of the chlorine addition mechanism that routinely provides free chlorine to the pool for sanitizing the water. In almost all cases, the usual dosage of non-chlorine shocks is compatible with whatever chlorine compound is in use.

Whichever way you choose to shock your pool is satisfactory.......the key to this is the application of the amount required to do the job at hand. This information is product label data that should be followed to achieve the desired result.

Orenda



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